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2 Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy Leads to Reversal of Heart Failure Induced Sarcopenia
  1. David Warriner1,
  2. Philip Webb1,
  3. Paul Sheridan2,
  4. Patricia Lawford1
  1. 1Sheffield University
  2. 2Chesterfield Royal Infirmary

Abstract

Background Sarcopenia, a reduction in skeletal muscle performance, is common in heart failure (HF) and grip strength (GS) is a measure of such. No trial has investigated the role of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) in reversing sarcopenia.

Methods GS was measured at baseline and 12 months following CRT. The patient group were 94% male, mean age 69 ± 8 years, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II-IV, QRSd 173 ± 21 ms and had a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 26 ± 8%.

Results 70% of patients were found to have responded at 12 months. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6 ± 1.7 to 14.7 ± 1.5 ml/kg/min, p < 0.05), quality of life score (43 ± 23 to 24 ± 22, p < 0.01), left ventricular end diastolic volume (210 ± 125 ml to 173 ± 125 ml, p < 0.01), 6 min walk distance (379 ± 117 m at baseline to 418 ± 105 m (p < 0.05) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (2422 ± 829 to 1732 ± 976 pg/ml, p < 0.01). GS significantly increased, by over 18% in responders during follow-up.

Conclusion This study demonstrates responders demonstrate a significant improvement in GS following CRT. This demonstrates that CRT improves not only cardiac performance but also secondary gains in skeletal muscle function.

  • Sarcopenia
  • Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy
  • Grip Strength

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