Article Text

PDF

Determinants and importance of atrial pressure morphology in atrial septal defect.
  1. D N Parikh,
  2. J Fisher,
  3. J W Moses,
  4. H L Goldberg,
  5. A R Levin,
  6. M A Engle,
  7. J S Borer

    Abstract

    A prominent "v" wave relative to the "a" wave in the jugular vein and right atrial pressure tracing is considered to be a common haemodynamic sign of atrial septal defect. Since the prevalence, age relation, and haemodynamic determinants of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration have not been studied the pressure recordings from 15 adults and 80 children with an isolated secundum atrial septal defect in sinus rhythm and from 40 adults and 55 children in sinus rhythm without structural cardiac abnormalities or with coronary and valvular heart disease were studied to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration in atrial septal defect. Only 20% of adults with an atrial septal defect had prominent right atrial "v" waves compared with 63% of children, although the specificity was quite high for each group. In adults "left atrialisation " of the right atrium ("v" greater than or equal to "a" wave) occurred in younger patients with higher right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures. In contrast, in children no age related or haemodynamic determinants for the "v" greater than or equal to "a" pattern were found. In addition, most adults but few children with an atrial septal defect had "right atrialisation " of the left atrial wave configuration ("a" greater than "v"). This was found in older adults with lower right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures and in older children with larger left to right shunts. Thus in contrast to children adults with an atrial septal defect rarely show a prominent "v" wave in the right atrium. The presence of a prominent right atrial "v" wave in adults with an atrial septal defect is associated with relatively higher left atrial and right heart pressures than is the absence of this sign and may be related to relatively higher systolic transatrial flow in these patients. The relative paucity of prominent right atrial "v" waves in older adults suggest that the systolic phase flow may diminish with age, possibly from progressive alteration in compliance of the chronically dilated right ventricle.

    Statistics from Altmetric.com

    Request permissions

    If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.