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Silent myocardial ischaemia in patients referred for coronary bypass surgery because of angina: a comparison with patients whose symptoms were well controlled on medical treatment.
  1. D Mulcahy,
  2. J Keegan,
  3. D Lindsay,
  4. J Sparrow,
  5. A Park,
  6. C Wright,
  7. K Fox
  1. National Heart Hospital, London.

    Abstract

    The frequency and characteristics of silent ischaemia were prospectively studied in 114 patients with confirmed coronary artery disease and angina. Fifty seven patients who had angina that was not adequately controlled by standard medications were referred for elective coronary artery bypass surgery (group 1). Fifty seven other patients had symptoms that were well controlled on medical treatment (group 2). Patients underwent treadmill exercise testing (n = 109) and 48 hours of ambulatory ST segment monitoring (total 5125 hours). Patients in group 1 had more severe coronary artery disease and a shorter time to 1 mm ST segment depression and maximal exercise. Twenty two patients in group 1 (38%) and 16 in group 2 (28%) had greater than or equal to 1 episode of silent ischaemia during 48 hours of ST monitoring. There was no significant difference in the mean frequency of silent ischaemic episodes in 24 hours between the two groups (group 1 0.72 v group 2 0.64); however, the mean frequency of painful ischaemic episodes in 24 hours was greater in group 1 patients (0.51) than in group 2 (0.11). In both groups the frequency of silent ischaemia was significantly related to a positive exercise test, as was the total duration of silent ischaemia. The circadian variation of silent ischaemia showed a peak of episodes in the evening in both groups. The frequency of silent ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease and angina receiving standard antianginal medications was not related to the severity of symptoms, but was significantly related to a positive exercise test. Thirty three percent of the patients studied had evidence of silent ischaemia during 48 hours of ambulatory ST segment monitoring; however, only four patients (3.5%) had frequent (>/=5) daily episodes of silent ischaemia.

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