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Reduction in ST segment elevation after thrombolysis predicts either coronary reperfusion or preservation of left ventricular function.
  1. R K Saran,
  2. M Been,
  3. S S Furniss,
  4. T Hawkins,
  5. D S Reid
  1. Cardiothoracic Unit, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne.

    Abstract

    The usefulness of a reduction in ST segment elevation to predict coronary reperfusion in myocardial infarction remains uncertain. ST segment changes and angiographic findings were compared in 45 patients soon after thrombolysis. The percentage ST segment change 3 hours after treatment (in the lead showing the greatest initial ST elevation) was compared with the TIMI perfusion grade (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction trial) obtained between 90 minutes and 3 hours after treatment. Global ejection fraction and regional wall motion were assessed by cineventriculography (11 (5) days (mean (SD))) and by gated blood pool imaging (44 (11) days). Prediction of coronary patency by a reduction of greater than 25% in ST segment elevation 3 hours after thrombolytic treatment had a sensitivity of 97% but a specificity of only 43%. Where the ST segment elevation was reduced by greater than 25% the global ejection fraction was well maintained whether or not the infarct vessel was patent. In patients with a reduction of less than 25% in ST elevation, the ejection fraction was significantly lower and regional wall motion abnormality more severe. Reduction in ST elevation of greater than 25% within 3 hours of thrombolysis indicates either a patent infarct artery or preservation of left ventricular function. When the ST segment elevation does not fall by greater than 25% persistent coronary occlusion is likely (predictive accuracy 86%) and is associated with a lower ejection fraction. These patients may benefit from further treatment or additional interventions.

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