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Clinical and research medicine: Hypertension
e0600 Impacts of obstructive sleep apnoea on the blood pressure in hypertensive patients under the optimal medication
  1. Zhao Qing,
  2. Liu Zhihong,
  3. Zhao Zhihui,
  4. Luo Qin,
  5. Zhang Hongliang,
  6. Wang Yong
  1. Fuwai Hospital

Abstract

Background and Objective Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a prevalent disease, however only 10% OSA patients receive regular treatment. OSA is an independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. We aim to investigate the impacts of obstructive sleep apnoea on the blood pressure in hypertensive patients under the optimal medication though office blood pressure and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24 h ABPM), respectively.

Methods 52 patients with hypertension were enrolled consecutively and all received the optimal medication for hypertension. An overnight polysomnography and a 24 h ABPM were performed to each patient. According to the apnoea-hypopnoea index, the patients were divided into four groups: no OSA group (AHI<5, n=13), mild OSA group (5≤AHI<15, n=19), moderate OSA group (15≤AHI<30, n=11), severe OSA group (AHI≥30, n=9). The results of 24 h ABPM and office pressure were compared respectively.

Results As to the 24 h ABPM results, 24 h systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly higher in severe OSA group than no OSA group (p value is 0.036 and 0.022), and night-time systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly higher too (p value is 0.046 and 0.024) in severe OSA group. Whereas no significant differences were found when compare day-time systolic and diastolic pressures between groups. Moreover, night-time diastolic pressure was significantly higher in severe OSA group than mild OSA group (p value is 0.039). After adjusting the confounders including age, sex, BMI, smoking and drinking history, and cardiovascular diseases, the statistic differences still remained. However, Office blood pressure including systolic and diastolic blood pressure had no significant differences between each two groups.

Conclusion Severe OSA significantly increases blood pressures, especially night-time blood pressures, of hypertensive patients who receive the optimal medication for hypertension. 24 h ABPM is more accurate than office pressure to evaluate the blood pressure of hypertensive patients with OSA.

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