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Ventricular fibrillation caused by extrinsic compression of the left main coronary artery
  1. Sandeep Sahay1,
  2. Adriano R Tonelli2
  1. 1Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
  2. 2Department of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sandeep Sahay, Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB1.284, Houston, TX 77030, USA; sandeepsahay{at}gmail.com

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Case-report

A 43-year-old woman with a history of ventricular septal defect (VSD) closure, pulmonary hypertension and partial Eisenmenger's physiology presented with in-field v-fib arrest. She was defibrillated to normal sinus rhythm. Echocardiography revealed dilated right ventricle (RV), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) of 88 mm Hg. A robust right-to-left shunt through a patent foramen ovale (PFO) was seen. A coronary CT angiogram revealed compressed left main coronary artery (LMCA) by severely dilated …

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