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GW24-e3734 A brief intervention for cardiovascular inpatients’ long-term effects after discharging on smoking cessation and influence factors
  1. Ziyang Huang,
  2. Yilong Liu,
  3. Zhenhua Wang
  1. Fujian Medical University Affiliated Second Clinical Medical College

Abstract

Objectives Social, Family, and Personal suffers a lot from smoking. For cardiovascular inpatients, smoking cessation is not only a effective method of secondary prevention, but also can significantly improve the prognosis, which have a lot of benefit. Presently, the whole world is exploring smoking cessation interventions which are brief and effective. The effective of accepting a brief smoking cessation intervention during hospitalisation for cardiovascular patients after discharging haven’t been ensured. Right now the Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical College is actively developing high quality nursing ward conditions, which provides a smoke-free environment for cardiovascular inpatients. The object of this study was to observe the long-term smoking abstinence rate after discharging of cardiovascular inpatients who had accepted a brief smoking cessation intervention during hospitalisation, and analysis of factors that were related to quitting successfully.

Methods The retrospective study involved 223 smokers with cardiovascular disease who were admitted to Fujian Medical University affiliated second Clinical Medical College from 2011 July to 2012 March. During hospitalisation, all of them had accepted a brief smoking cessation intervention and smoking was forbidden. In addiction to, they should also accept smoking cessation counsel from cardiovascular physician which takes about 15 min. Data regarding the continued abstinence of 1, 6, 9 months respectively from smoking following discharge were collected retrospectively via a telephone interview. And variables such as sex, age at admission, length of hospital stay, diagnosis on discharge, tobacco use, nicotine dependence, level of education were enter a Logistic regression model to obtain the independent effect factors of quitting successfully.

Results At 1 month, the abstinence rate was 75.5%. At 6, 12 months, the abstinence rate was 67.0%, and 58.0% respectively, which was declining significantly during the following year (p < 0.001). Discharge diagnosis and Length of hospital stay were the independent effect factors of quitting. Patients who diagnosed with ACS had a significantly lower probability of a smoking relapse compared with those who diagnosed with other cardiovascular disease: OR = 0.43, 95%CI (0.225∼0.820). Patients who stayed in hospital beyond 15 days had a significantly lower probability of a smoking relapse compared with those who had stayed less than 15 days: OR = 0.315, 95%CI (0.107∼0.924). And the other variables like sex (p = 0.451) , age at admission (p = 0.104), tobacco use (p = 0.602), nicotine dependence (p = 0.701), level of education (p = 0.105) were not the independent effect factors of quitting.

Conclusions 1) The abstinence rate during the following year of cardiovascular inpatients declining when they had discharged. 2) Discharge diagnosis was the independent risk factor of relapse, the patients who was diagnosed with disease associated with smoking had a higher abstinence rate. 3) Length of hospital stay was also the independent risk factor of relapse, the patients who had stayed longer had a higher abstinence rate. 4) Because of no smoking, the environment of hospital might help to promote the abstinence rate for cardiovascular inpatients.

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