Article Text

PDF
GW24-e0522 Incidence of acute mountain sickness in young adults at 3200 meters-comparison of the Lake Louise scoring and Chinese scoring systems
  1. Chen Guo Zhu,
  2. Huang Lan
  1. Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Third Military Medical University

Abstract

Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare two scoring systems used for diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS): Lake Louise Scoring (AMS-LLS) and Chinese Scoring System (AMS-CSS).

Methods 339 healthy young adult volunteers, resided at sea level (mean ± SD: age 24.59 ± 3.27 years; height 173.93 ± 5.18 cm; weight 68.21 ± 7.79 kg), ascended to 3200 m by train and bus, a total journey time of 48 hours, all the persons were ascend as same way, and were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 88), group 2 (n = 91) and group 3 (n = 160) were assessed after one, two and three nights, respectively, at altitude.

Results The overall incidence of AMS was 17.11% (n = 58) and 29.79% (n = 101) according to AMS-LLS and AMS-CSS, respectively. Two participants (0.59%) experienced high altitude pulmonary edema. Both scoring systems showed the highest incidence of AMS after the second night at high altitude. There was a good correlation between AMS-CSS and AMS-LLS scores (Pearson = 0.820, P < 0.001). AMS-CSS identified all AMS subjects diagnosed by AMS-LLS, plus an additional 43 missed by AMS-LLS. The dominant symptoms were reduced exercise tolerance (61.7%), fatigue (49.05%), dizziness (28.9%), chest distress (28.3%) and headache (27.4%). Compared with AMS-LLS, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of AMS-CSS were 100%, 84.7%, 57.43% and 100%, respectively. There was no relationship between oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels and AMS scores at 3200 m.

Conclusions AMS-CSS is similar, but a little different details, with AMS-LLS. AMS positive diagnosis outnumbers the LLS standard, but there might be a false positive. Headache was not the dominant symptom at 3200 m high altitude in this study, and SpO2 levels did not correlate with AMS scores.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.