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psychotropic medication: curing illness or creating problems?
  1. Kate Jolly (c.b.jolly{at}bham.ac.uk)
  1. University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
    1. Michael J S Langman (m.j.s.langman{at}bham.ac.uk)
    1. University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

      Abstract

      Depression has been noted to occur in approximately 1 in 6 people during their lifetime1, and to occur in nearly a fifth of patients following myocardial infarction (MI)2. As well as the morbidity associated with the symptoms of depression, it has been associated with a raised risk of death following MI independent of cardiac disease severity3. This has led to trials of treatment for depression in patients with heart disease. However, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of treatment of depression post-MI, such as the ENRICHD trial which used cognitive behavioural therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for more severe depression4, improved symptoms of depression, but did not reduce the frequency of adverse cardiac events.

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