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Next generation sequencing for clinical diagnostics and personalised medicine: implications for the next generation cardiologist
  1. James S Ware1,2,
  2. Angharad M Roberts1,
  3. Stuart A Cook1,3
  1. 1Molecular Cardiology, Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, London, UK
  2. 2National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK
  3. 3Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr James S Ware, Molecular Cardiology, 7S7 Commonwealth Building, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK; j.ware{at}imperial.ac.ukDr Angharad M Roberts, Molecular Cardiology, 7S7 Commonwealth Building, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK; angharad.roberts{at}imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

The fast moving field of genomic medicine is already impacting on clinical care and cardiologists are fortunate to be in a position to benefit early from the transformative advances in genomics. However, the challenges associated with genomics in the clinic in general, and with next generation sequencing technologies in particular, are significant and cardiologists need to be prepared if they wish to surf the wave of genomic opportunity. This paper presents an overview of the implications of next generation sequencing for clinical diagnostics and personalised medicine in the cardiology clinic.

  • Genetics
  • sudden cardiac death
  • MRI
  • growth factors
  • apoptosis
  • microvascular
  • gene expression

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Footnotes

  • JSW and AMR contributed equally to this work.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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