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Correspondence
Reply: diagnosing vascular mild cognitive impairment with atrial fibrillation remains a challenge
  1. Jocasta Ball1,2,
  2. Melinda J Carrington1,2,
  3. Simon Stewart1,2,
  4. on behalf of the SAFETY investigators
  1. 1NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease, Preventative Health, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2Department of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Professor Simon Stewart, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease, Preventative Health, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia; Simon.Stewart{at}bakeridi.edu.au

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The Authors’ reply We thank O'Caoimh and Molloy1 for their interest in our recent article published in Heart.2 We also appreciate their support of systematic screening for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in patients affected by chronic disease in order to best tailor their support and management. Identifying the best and most cost-effective clinical tool in this regard remains a challenge. We note that the authors are intimately involved in developing the Quick MCI Screen (Qmci), a tool they suggest is potentially more accurate in diagnosing MCI than the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) or even the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). We certainly welcome alternatives to the MoCA (our main interest being …

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