Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Original article
Ethnic differences in the cost-effectiveness of targeted and mass screening for high cardiovascular risk in the UK: cross-sectional study
  1. Jessica Baker1,
  2. Richard Mitchell1,
  3. Kenny Lawson2,
  4. Jill Pell1
  1. 1Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
  2. 2Health Economics and HTA, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
  1. Correspondence to Professor Jill Pell, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, 1 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow, G12 8RZ, UK; jill.pell{at}glasgow.ac.uk

Abstract

Objectives To investigate ethnic differences in the cost-effectiveness of targeted and mass screening for high cardiovascular risk.

Design Simulation of two screening strategies (targeted screening of most deprived areas and mass screening) using cross-sectional data from Health Survey for England.

Setting England.

Subjects 9407 adults aged 40–74 years (493 Black Caribbean, 532 Indian, 516 Pakistani/Bangladeshi, 617 Irish and 7249 general population of whom 6633 were White).

Main outcome measures Coverage of high-risk population, number needed to screen to identify one person at high cardiovascular risk and cost-effectiveness of targeted screening, with incremental analysis of expanding targeted to mass screening.

Results Coverage, number needed to screen and cost-effectiveness of targeted screening were better in all ethnic minority groups compared with the White group and general population. Targeted screening would identify 19.2% of high-risk individuals in the general population, and require 4.1 people to be screened to identify one person at high cardiovascular risk at a cost of £98. In the Pakistani/Bangladeshi group, 68.7% of the high-risk population would be identified, and only 2.5 people would need to be screened at a lower cost of £59. In comparison with targeted screening, mass screening was less cost-effective overall but the cost per additional high-risk individual detected was the lowest among the South Asian groups (Indian £130 and Pakistani/Bangladeshi £94).

Conclusions Irrespective of whether cardiovascular screening is targeted or universal, it is more cost-effective in South Asian ethnic groups than in the general population. Therefore, cardiovascular screening has the potential to reduce ethnic health inequalities.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.