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Stable coronary syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnostic advances and therapeutic need
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    Interventricular vessel of the heart

    I read with interest the bright review of stable coronary syndromes (1). In the formation of the fetal muscular part

    of the interventricular septum (IVS), the expanding ventricles grow and their medial walls approach and fuse, forming

    the septum. The inside corner between the septum and the right anterior ventricular wall exhibits the deep pits being

    called interventricular sinuses (ISs). The IS passes through the right IVS formed from the medial wall of the expanding

    fetal right ventricle (RV). The opening of the interventricular vessel (IV) (kuuselian vessel) is located in the IS between

    the medial walls of the expanding fetal RV and fetal left ventricle (LV). The IV is not a canal or channel or blood

    vessel, but a slit between the fibres of the muscle to the outer layer of the left central muscular part of the IVS and runs

    at an angle of about 90 degrees through sphincter and the left IVS into the LV. The IV exhibits 2 to 3 oval 2x5 mm

    openings in the left central muscular part of the IVS surrounded by the interventricular sphincter (ISP). The ISP and the

    IV are feasible to be patent by relaxing and widening of the helical heart at the right atrial filling phase at the end of the

    fetal diastole. The left to right communication do not result as the earliest left ventricular activation close the ISP. The

    sinoatrial node initially activates the right atrium (RA), followed by activation...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.