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Correspondence
Congenital tricuspid valve disease can masquerade as primary idiopathic tricuspid regurgitation
  1. Saurabh Rajpal1,2,
  2. Curt Daniels1,2,
  3. Michael Landzberg3,4
  1. 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  2. 2 Department of Cardiology, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  3. 3 Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  4. 4 Department of Cardiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr. Saurabh Rajpal, Departments of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210-1240, USA; saurabh.rajpal{at}osumc.edu

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The Authors’ reply

We read with interest the excellent and timely article on increasingly detected cases of isolated tricuspid valve regurgitation.1 The authors rightly note that there is an emerging population of adult patients without left-sided heart disease, pulmonary hypertension or congenital abnormalities who develop symptomatic isolated tricuspid regurgitation. While this is true, we believe that a proportion of these cases of isolated tricuspid regurgitation may well be congenital …

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