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Less than full-time training in cardiology
  1. Rebecca Dobson1,
  2. Abhishek Joshi2,
  3. Christopher Allen3,
  4. Hannah C Sinclair4
  1. 1 Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
  2. 2 Bart’s Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK
  3. 3 Guy’s & St Thomas' Hospital, Kings College, Rayne Institute, London, UK
  4. 4 University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Rebecca Dobson, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool L14 3PE, UK; rebecca.dobson{at}lhch.nhs.uk

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Introduction

In the UK, 15% of physician trainees are less than full time (LTFT) (25% of female and 3% of male trainees).1 The 2018 British Junior Cardiologists’ Association (BJCA) annual survey identified that approximately 4% of cardiology trainees work LTFT. To explore this further, a survey was sent to LTFT cardiology trainees to identify the challenges they face.

Demographics

Of the estimated 24 LTFT cardiology trainees in the UK, 70% completed the survey. Thirty-one per cent were male, much higher than the proportion of physician LTFT trainees who are male (9%).1 The majority of LTFT trainees are 31–40 years old and are training LTFT in a full-time post (88%). Nearly half of LTFT trainees work 80% of full time. Childcare responsibility is the most common reason for working LTFT (82%).

Results

The subspecialty interests of …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RD and HCS designed survey, drafted and reviewed article. CA and AJ disseminated the survey and reviewed article.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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