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CardioWebinar: the evolution of digital education during the COVID-19 pandemic
  1. Balrik Singh Kailey1,
  2. Damanpreet Dev2,
  3. Daniel M Sado3,
  4. Vishal Luther4,5
  1. 1 Cardiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2 Cardiology, Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Kettering, UK
  3. 3 Cardiology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  4. 4 Cardiology, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
  5. 5 Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Livepool, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Vishal Luther, Consultant Cardiologist, Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital, Liverpool L14 3PE, UK; vishal.luther{at}lhch.nhs.uk

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Formal face-to-face cardiology teaching was halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and innovation in digital education was required to fill the training gap. We created ‘CardioWebinar’ to deliver free, accessible, high-quality teaching to help maintain trainee morale and fill this gap. We hoped that by maintaining and improving knowledge we would indirectly improve patient care. This programme consisted of weekly live consultant-delivered webinars covering the breadth of cardiology, all recorded and available online for viewer convenience.

In this article, we explore the advantages and challenges of webinars in cardiology, using CardioWebinar as a case study.

Organisation

One advantage of webinars is the ease of delivery. Webinars need minimal administrative support and can be advertised on social media and through mailing lists. The event itself has no hotel fees, venue hire, catering or travel costs. Teaching can be organised relatively swiftly and at minimal cost. This simplicity has allowed CardioWebinar to deliver over 60 webinars in 15 months, watched by >15 000 people.

Breaking down educational barriers

Webinars …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @CardioWebinar, @vish_luther

  • Contributors All authors contributed equally to the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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