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Stroke and thromboembolism prevention in atrial fibrillation
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    The role of coexisting high-grade carotid artery stenosis in aetiopathogenesis of NVAF-associated stroke

    Given the fact that high-grade carotid artery stenosis(CAS)(50% or more stenosis) is an independent risk factor for stroke in patients with coexisting nonvalvular atrial fibrillation(NVAF)(1), the optimum management of NVAF patients who have symptomatic CAS should be included among the key outstanding research questions enumerated by the authors of the recent review(2). In one study high-grade CAS was prevalent in 12%-14% of NVAF patients aged 71-80(3).. When high-grade CAS gives rise to amaurosis fugax , transient ischaemic attack(TIA), or stroke, the urgent priority is to mitigate the risk of subsequent occurrence of disabling stroke. That priority should prevail irrespective of presence or absence of coexisting NVAF. Strategies to mitigate that risk include initiation of dual antiplatelet therapy(4)(5) followed by interventional treatment of the CAS itself(6).
    For patients in whom symptomatic CAS coexists with NVAF, when the latter is associated with a CHA2DS2-Vasc score that justifies oral anticoagulation to mitigate the risk of cardioembolis stroke , coprescription of oral anticoagulants has to be included in the management strategy. Furthermore after interventional treatment of symptomatic CAS, secondary prevention of neurological events(including stroke) necessitates long term antithrombotic medication with aspirin(5). Concurrently , in the presence of coexisting NVAF, long term primary prevention of cardioembolic stroke necessitates long...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.