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Cardiac manifestations of rheumatological disease: a synopsis for the cardiologist
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    Bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal co-infection involving the pericardium or myocardium in rheumatological disordersa
    • oscar,m jolobe, retired geriarician member(but not an affiliate) of the manchester medical society. I now list my home address or the BMA as my affiliation

    For the sake of completeness, the cardiac manifestations of rheumatological disorders documented by Sen et al(1) also ought to include bacterial as well as mycobacterial and fungal infections which invade either the pericardium or the myocardium in patients with rheumatological disorders. The following are some examples:-
    Suppurative pericarditis attributable to Staphylococcus aureus was documented by Huskisson et al in one of the patients in their series of 12 rheumatiod arthritis(RA) patients with severe , unusual and recurrent infections(2). A massive tuberculous plericardial effusion was documented in a 60 year old man with long-standing RA who was not taking any immunosuppressive medication(3).
    Staphylococcal pericarditis was reported in a 52 year old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) who was on prednisolone(4). Tuberculous pericarditis coexisted with SLE in 3 patients who were participants in a series consisting of 72 SLE patients with coexisting active tuberculosis infection(5).
    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis was the underlying rheumatological disorder in a 60 year old woman who died after experiencing complications of congestive heart failure. Autopsy examination revealed invasive myocarditis secondary to Aspergillus fumigatus infection as well as multiple myocardial abscesses(6).
    Comment
    In the context of multisystem rheumatological disease the expectation is that the occurrence of pericarditis a...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.