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Original article
Prognostic implications of bleeding measured by Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) categorisation in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention
  1. Dragan M Matic1,
  2. Dejan G Milasinovic2,
  3. Milika R Asanin3,4,
  4. Igor B Mrdovic3,4,
  5. Jelena M Marinkovic5,
  6. Nikola I Kocev5,
  7. Marija M Marjanovic2,
  8. Nebojsa M Antonijevic3,4,
  9. Vladan D Vukcevic2,4,
  10. Lidija Z Savic1,
  11. Milorad N Zivkovic2,
  12. Zlatko H Mehmedbegovic2,
  13. Vladimir M Dedovic2,
  14. Goran R Stankovic2,4
  1. 1Emergency Department, Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
  2. 2Department for Diagnostic and Catheterization Laboratories, Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
  3. 3Emergency Department, Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
  4. 4Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
  5. 5Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Goran Stankovic, Department for Diagnostic and Catheterization Laboratories, Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Dr Koste Todorovica 8, Belgrade 11000, Serbia; gorastan{at}sbb.rs

Abstract

Objective To investigate the relationship between inhospital bleeding as defined by Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) consensus classification and short-term and long-term mortality in unselected patients admitted for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Methods We analysed data of all consecutive patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) admitted for primary PCI, enrolled in a prospective registry of a high volume centre. The BARC-defined bleeding events were reconstructed from the detailed, prospectively collected clinical data. The primary outcome was mortality at 1 year.

Results Of the 1808 patients with STEMI admitted for primary PCI, 115 (6.4%) experienced a BARC type ≥2 bleeding. As the BARC bleeding severity worsened, there was a gradient of increasing rates of 1-year death. The 1-year mortality rate increased from 11.5% with BARC 0+1 type to 43.5% with BARC type 3b bleeding. After multivariable adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, the independent predictors of 1-year death were BARC type 3a (HR 1.99; 95% CI 1.16 to 3.40, p=0.012) and BARC type 3b bleeding (HR 3.22; 95% CI 1.67 to 6.20, p<0.0001).

Conclusions The present study demonstrated that bleeding events defined according to the BARC classification hierarchically correlate with 1-year mortality after admission for primary PCI. The strongest predictor of 1-year mortality is the BARC type 3b bleeding.

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